Monthly Archives: October 2013

live coverage round up – skate jam

Alexis:

Our groups coverage on Sunday taught Cherice and I the real-life shortcomings that could happen during live coverage. Due to miscalculations, we were unable to procure Verizon hotspot technology, so Cherice and I acted in the editor position in a nearby Starbucks for the free wifi while the rest of our group members worked as reporters in the field.

When we were in class Friday, the Scribble Live test worked, but when we were ready on event day, our reporters did not have access to the new Live Event we created on Scribble. When we would invite them, they’re invite emails would lead to a “You do not have access message”. We arrived to our event 2 hours before it’s start time, but my correspondence with Scribble Live support staff was not providing a solution quick enough.

It was very stressful trying to figure out a solution, but it taught us how prepared you need to be on game-day. We did not use CoverItLive by choice, but by necessity. Both applications are very similar and we knew timeliness is of the essence when reporting live.

Technology: CoverIt Live was my first time using such software and I believe if our internet speed was greater, it would have been much smoother to use. It has access to twitter users/keywords, wikipedia pages and instagram users. I could also type content or upload pictures directly from my computer. It also had a downloadable app, but the battery drainage power was insane, so I had our reporters tweeting, commenting and posting directly to social media. We decided on the tag #NYSkateJam on all postings. Then, I would search for the hashtags and their user names to post from my station. The only thing noticeably different between it and Scribble, is Scribble also has a facebook option I believe.

The team:I feel like our team was awesome. At the event, our reporters (Leila, Becca, Emma….and later Cherice) took different positions. Their vantage points were different which added to diverse coverage. They collaborated together to do different things. One would take video from atop a ramp, while another would get quotes from event participants. Communication was flawless, they kept me abreast on event scheduling…what was coming next etc. via text and calls. If I could have done anything differently, I would have had each reporter do one specific thing (video, audio, photography, quotes) so that there was no overlap or duplicate.

Coverage: I am pleased with the coverage except for a couple of bumps. Video coverage worked for me. It played on my computer save one, so I am still wondering what hiccup happened there. Because of our event logistics, a skateboarding competition, I thought our coverage should have been more visual-heavy as it was interesting and cool. The event itself was kind of lax, so it was hard getting winner first and last names and that is something I wish we could have gotten. Also, at one point I had cabin fever and decided to work from my phone app and join my team at the park. That was a mistake. My phone was wickedly slow in uploading anything other than text using the 3G. Therefore, when walking BACK to Starbucks, there was about 11 minutes where nothing was being posted- which was my fault. Then when I finally got hooked up to wifi, I had to backtrack and post back to back expeditiously. Other than that, the reporters worked amazingly. Their coverage was visually appealing and humorous at many points. When there was a lull in the competition, I tried, as an editor, post background: info from sponsors, history of the skate park and founder, legend skateboarder Andy Kessler, and definitions of some of the terminology. Overall, I feel like our group did a good job in a hurried environment. 🙂

Cherice:
Technology: Actually, Scribblelive only worked on internal level last Friday. The options (to get embed code) looked nothing like the instruction on the google doc John gave us. I assumed that’s an issue with CUNY account setting, so I created another account with my personal email and invited everyone. But it was still not working for unknown reasons. BTW, wordpress.com does not work well with embed codes. Blogger handles embed code well, and it is faster to load than wordpress.com as we were stuck with slow wifi speed at Starbucks. It doesn’t have many themes to choose from, but the simplest one is good enough for our purpose.
Team: I don’t have much to add because I was the loner IT guy for the most part.
Coverage: I think this was the perfect event for this media. It’s a very visual event and things were happening continuously.

Chelsea Gallery Crawl

 

Skate Jam 2013 Live Report

Also here: http://skatejam2013.blogspot.com

 

Circle of Life- Alexis Barnes Photo Essay

I am still learning how to adjust my settings for indoor or low light situations, so I am not pleased with my indoor photos. But alas, birth…

 

Doula, Amadoma Bediaka, rubs her eyes after 30 minutes of reading pain-control affirmations to the laboring mother.
Doula, Amadoma Bediaka, rubs her eyes after 30 minutes of reading pain-control affirmations to the laboring mother.
Jessyca Marshall rocks on a yoga ball to relieve contractions.
Jessyca Marshall rocks on a yoga ball to relieve contractions.

 

Father, Bobson St. Pierre, looks on as Jessyca soothes contractions in her birthing pool.
Father, Bobson St. Pierre, looks on as Jessyca soothes contractions in her birthing pool.

 

After complications and transport to Woodhull Hospital, Jessyca Marshall's midwife rubs her back during a contraction.
After complications and transport to Woodhull Hospital, Jessyca Marshall’s midwife rubs her back during a contraction.

 

Mother and daughter enjoy first contact.
Mother and daughter enjoy first contact.

 

Father and mother soothe baby with reassuring touches.
Father and mother soothe baby with reassuring touches.
Newborn, Nubia, sleeps peacefully.
Newborn, Nubia, sleeps peacefully.

 

Nubia stretches her feet amidst IV tubing.
Nubia stretches her feet amidst IV tubing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HUB – Bikes their own way, on the way out?

The HUB (an acronym which stands for Hudson Urban Bicycles), is a bike shop in Manhattan’s West Village whose survival is on the line after the introduction of Citibike, New York City’s 4-month-old bike sharing program.  Both sales and rentals are down fifty percent since June.

The shop is of a different mold than what American consumers are accustomed to.  It does not deal in “sport bikes.”  Instead, they sell Dutch-style transportation bikes.  The rider sits upright instead of hunched over the handlebars, and casings over the wheels and chains ensure that clothing will not become dirtied or snagged while riding.  The emphasis is on practical city commuting rather than speed.

The shop exists off-the-grid, without power, water, or heat.  They collect rainwater to flush the toilets and use a gasoline-powered generator for the few compact fluorescent bulbs that hang throughout the space.  The owner, George Bliss, employees, and customers speak very fondly of the entire riding philosophy that the HUB stands for, as well as the community of people that are involved in it.  They don’t want to see it wiped out by a city program that they feel has surrounded them, with 5 docking stations in the immediate vicinity of the store.  Bliss foresees closing for the winter, and isn’t sure what spring will bring.

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The HUB bicycle shop in Manhattan’s West Village on Oct. 16, 2013.

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The HUB promotes the use of Dutch-style bicycles.

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Owner George Bliss, with his dog Moxie, is passionate about his biking philosophy.  He thinks the biking community in the U.S. can be fanatical and intimidating for the uninitiated, and turn people off to incorporating biking into their daily routine.  “The Dutch aren’t into bicycles any more than Americans are into refrigerators.  They have them–it’s part of their lifestyle.”

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The seats are wider and more comfortable to sit on that the standard racing or mountain bike.

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The walls are covered in historic images of people riding bikes.

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Repair tickets are posted on the wall.  The shop does “fix and sells,” repairs, and lets bike owners park their bikes at the shop.

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Bike mechanic Jeremy Boniello works on a bike in the back of the shop.

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Delilah Jones describes herself as the weekday “Bike Rental Girl.”

“Citibike is putting us out of business. Look around.  It’s a warm day in mid-October. There’s literally no one in the shop right now,” she says.

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One of a few bike repair areas.

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Moxie is under a year old, but already knows the ropes of being a shop dog.  Even though she’s in heat, she’s a calm presence.

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By various estimates of the employees and owner, there are between 300 and 500 bikes in the shop.

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Bicycle bells are for sale next to the cash register, hanging on a fire escape sculpture fashioned by a friend of George Bliss, the owner.  His interests in designing, inventing, and building also extend beyond the bicycle realm.  He’s very interested in treehouses right now.  He is currently working on a spiral staircase using a huge loom in the back of the shop.  It’s in the beginning stages and not very photogenic…

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The bike that Nevada Harris (pictured below) has been cleaning this afternoon is pretty dirty.

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Intern Nevada Harris is a student at City As School–an alternative public high school whose students engage in hands-on learning throughout the city. “We’re not trying to be that cool bike shop that has sports bikes.  My eyes are being opened,” she says.

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Regular customer Jedi Sanchez rides away from The HUB on his rental bike to do errands around the city.  “I love this bike shop,” he says.

 

Lesson learned (or still to be learned):  Editing photos down from hundreds to under a dozen is nearly impossible for an indecisive person.  Like children, you love them equally.  *Sigh*

King of Kingsbridge (Brody Photo Essay)

On January 8, 1961, 17-year-old Fredy Loeser and his father opened Loeser’s Kosher Deli with money Fredy had saved from his bar mitzvah. His father, a professional chef, had long wanted a store of his own, but had failed in previous ventures. At the time, the store — on 231st St., just a half block off Broadway, in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx — was in a section of the Bronx that was “Italian, Jewish and Irish,” according to Fredy Loeser.

Today, the area is predominantly African American and Latino, but Loeser’s is still going strong, the oldest kosher deli in the Bronx, and one of only two remaining. In recent years, Loeser has passed 50 years in business, been read into the Congressional Record, and had his pastrami sandwich named the best in the city. His store continues to look like a deli from the 1960s.

16 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Loeser's, on 231st St. in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx, is the oldest of only two remaining kosher delis in the borough. 10/16/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
16 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Loeser’s, on 231st St. in the Kingsbridge section of the Bronx, is the oldest of only two remaining kosher delis in the borough. 10/16/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Fredy Loeser opened the deli with his father, who had worked as a chef at the Waldorf, in January 1961. He refers to himself as a "tough bastard." 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Fredy Loeser opened the deli with his father, who had worked as a chef at the Waldorf, in January 1961. He refers to himself as a “tough bastard.” 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Seen here in the deli case, Fredy Loeser's pastrami was named the best in the city by the New York Daily News in 2011. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Seen here in the deli case, Fredy Loeser’s pastrami was named the best in the city by the New York Daily News in 2011. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. The walls of Loeser's are bare bones, but they feature numerous articles, plaques, celebrity diners and other honors from its 52-year history. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. The walls of Loeser’s are bare bones, but they feature numerous articles, plaques, celebrity diners and other honors from its 52-year history. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Despite his quiet, Loeser says courtesy towards customers is one of the keys to his success, and he knows many of his customers' name. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Despite his quiet, Loeser says courtesy towards customers is one of the keys to his success, and he knows many of his customers’ name. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Loeser serves his famed pastrami sandwich on a paper place mat with a list of the presidents and a plastic plate. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Loeser serves his famed pastrami sandwich on a paper place mat with a list of the presidents and a plastic plate. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Loeser's partners with Hebrew National for much of his products, including hot dogs. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Loeser’s partners with Hebrew National for much of his products, including hot dogs. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Other signs at Loeser's advertise "Jewish Penicillin" (matzo ball soup) or commemorate the store's 50th anniversary in 2011. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Other signs at Loeser’s advertise “Jewish Penicillin” (matzo ball soup) or commemorate the store’s 50th anniversary in 2011. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. Loeser was honored on his 50th anniversary in 2011 and presented with this plaque by Rep. Eliot Engel. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. Loeser was honored on his 50th anniversary in 2011 and presented with this plaque by Rep. Eliot Engel. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. When the Loesers opened their deli, the neighborhood was "Italian, Jewish, and Irish," according to Fredy Loeser. Today, it is mostly African American and Latino. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. When the Loesers opened their deli, the neighborhood was “Italian, Jewish, and Irish,” according to Fredy Loeser. Today, it is mostly African American and Latino. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 - Bronx, NY. A frequent sight at Loeser's: an empty plate. 10/12/13 - Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo
12 October 2013 – Bronx, NY. A frequent sight at Loeser’s: an empty plate. 10/12/13 – Photograph by BEN BRODY/CUNY Journalism Photo

Wednesday Knight Fights

Well, here it is. A bunch of crazy dudes fighting each other with Medieval Weapons.

Lessons learned:

  • Church gymnasium lighting is not the best. It presents quite the challenge when you’re trying to shoot fast-moving sparring matches.
  • Knight fighters may be enthusiastic about the idea of you taking their photograph, but when you actually show up they get wary.
  • Say what you want about this bizarre practice session, their armor is HEAVY and they do beat the bejesus out of one another. I tried on a helmet and felt like my head was bogged down by rocks.
  • I tried to take portraits of a few of the knights using the portrait setting, but they did not come out well. I did not include these in my essay.

Nonetheless, challenge accepted.

Ch-check it out:

https://madeleineperkins.jux.com